"The Driving Chimes" Scrapbook

 

By June Newman

 Black Swamp Driving Club

The Best of the "Driving Chimes" 1992-1994

What is it?  

Can you identify the following pictures?

 

  


(A)

(B)


 

(C)

(D)

(E)


(F)

    (Answers on page 2)

(G)

Driving Hints

A horse is timid by nature; patient training will replace his fear with trust.

Horses are more difficult to manage in the presence of strange horses - especially mares and stallions.

For no apparent reason, a horse will sometimes begin to back.  This requires quick action to prevent an upset or other accident.

The horse's shoes must be adequate to prevent slipping on smooth pavement.

The reins and bitting should be adequate to stop your horses in the event of a runaway.

Never take a completely green horse to a show or driving event.  First, find out how he behaves when being driven in company with other carriages.

Never try to put a bridle on a horse when away from his home stable without first securing him with a rope around his neck.

Never take the bridle off while the horse is still attached to the vehicle; not even when he has a halter under the bridle.

Never allow horses to canter or gallop in harness even though it may be necessary for a four-in-hand to gallop in certain conditions.  Only the most skilled whips should do so.

Never allow your attention to be distracted.

Always take great care when passing another carriage and only do so when you can see sufficient clear road in front.

Always carry you whip or, at least have it ready to hand, as it may be needed quickly to avert an accident.

Never start to hitch the horse to the vehicle without having the reins fastened to the bridle.

Always remember to signal to other traffic before stopping or turning.

  (Answers on page 2)

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Homemade Fly Spray

Here on our farm,  flys are a real problem but we have found a great solution.  It is a combination of oils - Eucalyptus, Citronella, and Scarlet oil with with witch hazel - all mixed with vegetable oil (to work as a carrier as it is less expensive).  What I do is use approximately 4 tablespoonfuls of the eucalyptus and citronella oil along with the same amount or a bit more of the scarlet oil.  Then add a good pour of witch hazel (it is not very expensive and its stinks to you know what).  All of the above should be added to about 1 to 1 1/2 cups of vegetable oil and approximately 4-6 cups of water.  If the above mixture is put into some sort of sprayer and shaken well during the application, it will keep the flys from biting for at least a couple days.